make

make vb Make, form, shape, fashion, fabricate, manufacture, forge can all mean to cause something to come into being or existence.
This is the underlying meaning of make, the most general and the most widely applicable of these terms. Make may imply the operation either of an intelligent agent or of a blind agency, and either material or immaterial existence
{

make a chair

}
{

make a poem

}
{

make a choice

}
{

this factory makes bicycles

}
{

he is unable to make friends

}
{

God made the world

}
{

the spider makes webs

}
{

the liver makes bile

}
Form adds to make the implication that the thing brought into being has a definite outline, design, or structure
{

a sculptor who forms hands with exquisite delicacy

}
{

we are ready to form a plan

}
{

form a federation of states

}
{

character is partly formed by training

}
Shape, though often interchangeable with form, is much more restricted in its application because it characteristically connotes an external agent that physically or figuratively impresses a particular form upon something (as by molding, beating, carving, or cutting)
{

the blacksmith shapes a horseshoe on his anvil

}
{

shape a hat on a block

}
{

events that shaped his career

}
{

every life is a work of art shaped by the man who lives it— Dickinson

}
Fashion means to form, but it implies an intelligent and sometimes a purposeful agency and more or less inventive power or ingenuity
{

he fashioned a lamp out of an old churn

}
{

legislative committees often fashion strange bills out of miscellaneous suggestions

}
{

intelligent creatures, fashioned by the hand and in the image of an all-wise God— Hambly

}
Fabricate stresses a making that unites many parts or materials into a whole
{

Dr. Hitchings and his associates alone have fabricated more than 500 compounds resembling one or another of the simpler chemicals out of which D. N. A. (an enormously complex substance) is fashioned in the cell— Engel

}
and it usually connotes either a making according to a standardized pattern
{

fabricate doors, windows, and other parts of a house

}
or skillfulness in construction
{

fabricate a good plot for a novel

}
{

fabricated a creed fitted to meet the sordid misery of real human life— Woolf

}
Very commonly fabricate implies an imaginative making or inventing of something false
{

the particulars of that genealogy, embellished with every detail that memory had handed down or fancy fabricatedStevenson

}
{

his feats of legerdemain sounded so improbable that many people considered his experiences fabricatedHeiser

}
Manufacture emphasizes the making of something by labor, originally by hand but now more often by machinery. The term is applied to a making in which raw materials are used and a definite process or series of processes is followed
{

manufacture cloth

}
{

manufacture kitchen utensils

}
{

manufacture automobiles

}
In extended use manufacture often is preferred to the preceding words when laboriousness or the knowledge of the mechanics of a process, rather than skill or ingenuity, is connoted
{

manufacture paintings by the dozen

}
{

the strain of manufacturing conversation for at least ten minutes— Fienburgh

}
Forge basically suggests the operation of a smith who heats metal and beats or hammers it into shape
{

forge a horseshoe

}
{

forge a chain

}
In its extended sense it carries a strong implication of devising or concocting by physical or mental effort so as to give the appearance of truth or reality
{

the proud have forged a lie against me: but I will keep thy precepts with my whole heart— Ps 119:69

}
{

whate'er I forge to feed his brainsick fits, do you uphold and maintain in your speeches— Shak.

}
{

however feeling may render plastic the stuff of poetry, the poem, if it be worthy of the name, is forged in the brain— Lowes

}
In specific use, both legal and ordinary, forge implies the making of a counterfeit, especially by imitating the handwriting of an original or of a supposed maker; thus, one forges a document, such as a will, deed, or check, by making or signing it in imitation of another's handwriting or by making alterations in a genuine document by the same means.
Analogous words: produce, turn out, yield, *bear: accomplish, achieve, effect, fulfill (see PERFORM)

New Dictionary of Synonyms. 2014.

Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

  • make — make, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {made} (m[=a]d); p. pr. & vb. n. {making}.] [OE. maken, makien, AS. macian; akin to OS. mak?n, OFries. makia, D. maken, G. machen, OHG. mahh?n to join, fit, prepare, make, Dan. mage. Cf. {Match} an equal.] 1. To cause to …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Make — (m[=a]k), v. i. 1. To act in a certain manner; to have to do; to manage; to interfere; to be active; often in the phrase to meddle or make. [Obs.] [1913 Webster] A scurvy, jack a nape priest to meddle or make. Shak. [1913 Webster] 2. To proceed;… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Make Me — Single by Janet Jackson from the album Number Ones Released …   Wikipedia

  • Make — may refer to: Make (software), a computer software utility Make (magazine), a DIWO (Do It With Others) technology periodical and the associated television program MAKE Architects, a UK architecture practice Make, Botswana, a small village in the… …   Wikipedia

  • Make It So — Single by The Dickies Released 1994 Genre Punk rock …   Wikipedia

  • Make — Make, n. Structure, texture, constitution of parts; construction; shape; form. [1913 Webster] It our perfection of so frail a make As every plot can undermine and shake? Dryden. [1913 Webster] {On the make}, (a) bent upon making great profits;… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Make It Do — Breed Quarter Horse Discipline Rodeo Sex Gelding Foaled 1964 …   Wikipedia

  • Make Up — Compilation album by Flower Travellin Band Released February 25, 1973 Genre Psychedelic rock Length …   Wikipedia

  • make — (m[=a]k), n. [AS. maca, gemaca. See {Match}.] A companion; a mate; often, a husband or a wife. [Obs.] [1913 Webster] For in this world no woman is Worthy to be my make. Chaucer. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • make — I. verb (made; making) Etymology: Middle English, from Old English macian; akin to Old High German mahhōn to prepare, make, Greek magēnai to be kneaded, Old Church Slavic mazati to anoint, smear Date: before 12th century transitive verb 1. a.… …   New Collegiate Dictionary

  • make up — verb Date: 14th century transitive verb 1. a. to form by fitting together or assembling < make up a train of cars > b. to arrange typeset matter in (as pages) for printing 2. a. to combine to produce (a sum or whole) b. constitute, compose …   New Collegiate Dictionary


Share the article and excerpts

Direct link
Do a right-click on the link above
and select “Copy Link”

We are using cookies for the best presentation of our site. Continuing to use this site, you agree with this.